Getting around the Monterosa Region

You’ll find it a dream getting around the Monterosa area with its lack of queues for the chairlifts and gondolas that provide a fast and efficient way to get around Champoluc, Gressoney and Alagna.

The superb ski lifts in Monterosa make it easy to explore the variety of skiing and in Champoluc village, two lifts give good access to Champoluc’s ski area and the linked resorts of Gressoney and Alagna.  The funicular railway from Frachey (a hamlet at the head of Ayas Valley) is popular if you need to reach Gressoney quickly or you can take the main gondola that rises up to Crest, where the beginners’ slopes are situated. No drag lifts in the Monterosa ski area make it very popular with snowboarders.

At the end of each day, a red run leads back from the top of the gondola through the trees to the centre of the resort and back to the door of our ski deposit. Less able (or tired!) skiers can use the gondola to come back down to the village.

Once you’re back warming your toes by the fire and tucking into a late afternoon tea, you can keep track of where you’ve been, how far you’ve covered and the times you’ve been through the ski lifts in Monterosa on the valley’s very own iPhone App – ideal for keeping an eye on your time in the mountains.

Champoluc at a Glance

Resort altitude: 1564m

Highest lift: 3341m

Vertical drop: 1212m

Total pistes: 200km

Nursery areas: 6

Pistes: Beginner/Intermediate/Advanced/Off-piste – 19/40/6/excellent

Cable cars: 3

Gondolas/chairlifts: 5/12

Drag lifts: 0

Snow parks: 1 (Gressoney)

Night-skiing: No

The Ski Club of Great Britain echoes our fondness for the resort:

“A lively little base for the Monte Rosa region. Champoluc is a beautiful town with direct access to wide open pistes and practically no lift queues. This relatively unknown (to the British) ski town has seen a lot of growth over the last few years. There are now around 800 beds at varying prices, several very good restaurants and a couple of lively bars, all with the charm and friendliness of the Italian Aosta valley. The old part of town is small but perfectly formed, with winding cobbled pathways leading you up the south-facing slope of the valley.”